Research

NYU Langone Medical Center to Lead Research to Develop Breath Test for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

August 25, 2014 (All day)

NYU Langone Medical Center will lead a new clinical initiative -- funded by a $225,000 grant from The National Institutes of Health -- to determine a breath test’s effectiveness to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human breath that are biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study will employ patented technology developed by Menssana Research, a leading developer of advanced new breath tests for early detection of a wide variety of illnesses and diseases, and the principal recipient of the NIH grant.

Early Antibiotic Exposure Leads to Lifelong Metabolic Disturbances in Mice

August 14, 2014 (All day)

A new study published today in Cell suggests that antibiotic exposure during a critical window of early development disrupts the bacterial landscape of the gut, home to trillions of diverse microbes, and permanently reprograms the body's metabolism, setting up a predisposition to obesity. Moreover, the study shows that it is altered gut bacteria, rather than the antibiotics, driving the metabolic effects.
 

Researchers Identify a Brain 'Switchboard' Important in Attention and Sleep

August 14, 2014 - 12:00pm

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, using a mouse model, have recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in a small part of the brain that works as a "switchboard," directing signals coming from the outside world or internal memories. Because human brain disorders such as schizophrenia, autism, and post-traumatic stress disorder typically show disturbances in that switchboard, the investigators say the work suggests new strategies in understanding and treating them.

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 (All day)
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In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease.

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is one of the most common and aggressive childhood blood cancers. An estimated quarter of the 500 adolescents and young adults diagnosed with the cancer each year in the U.S. fail to achieve remission with standard chemotherapy drugs.

Measuring Nurture: Study Shows How “Good Mothering” Hardwires Infant Brain

July 17, 2014 (All day)

By carefully watching nearly a hundred hours of video showing mother rats protecting, warming, and feeding their young pups, and then matching up what they saw to real-time electrical readings from the pups’ brains, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that the mother’s presence and social interactions — her nurturing role — directly molds the early neural activity and growth of her offsprings’ brain.

NYU Researchers Find 18 Percent of High School Seniors Smoke Hookah

July 7, 2014 (All day)

While cigarette use is declining precipitously among youth, evidence indicates that American adolescents are turning to ethnically-linked alternative tobacco products, such as hookahs, cigars, and various smokeless tobacco products, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Now a new study by researchers affiliated with New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR), in the August 2014 edition of Pediatrics identifies how prevalent Hookah use is and which teens are most likely to be using it.

TB Dogma Upended: Even Uninfected Cells Trigger Immune Defenses

June 11, 2014 (All day)

Experimenting with mice, infectious disease experts at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that immune system cells uninfected with the bacterium that causes tuberculosis trigger immune system T cells to fight the disease. The findings upend the long-held scientific belief that only cells, known specifically as dendritic cells, infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis could stimulate a broader, defensive immune system attack of the invading microorganism.

Sleep After Learning Strengthens Connections Between Brain Cells and Enhances Memory, NYU Langone Scientists Find

June 5, 2014 (All day)

In study published today in Science, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show for the first time that sleep after learning encourages the growth of dendritic spines, the tiny protrusions from brain cells that connect to other brain cells and facilitate the passage of information across synapses, the junctions at which brain cells meet. Moreover, the activity of brain cells during deep sleep, or slow-wave sleep, after learning is critical for such growth.

New Amyloid-Reducing Compound Could Be a Preventive Measure Against Alzheimer’s

June 3, 2014 (All day)

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have identified a compound, called 2-PMAP, in animal studies that reduced by more than half levels of amyloid proteins in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers hope that someday a treatment based on the molecule could be used to ward off the neurodegenerative disease since it may be safe enough to be taken daily over many years.