NYU Cancer Institute Report 2009

Inside This Issue

Select Headlines:

  • Embracing Diversity, Fighting Disparity
    Today some 40 percent of New Yorkers claim another country as their birthplace. Yet even as the diversity of the population enriches the city, it also brings special healthcare challenges, not the least of which is disparity in the incidence and treatment of cancer.
     
  • The Perfect Environment
    The Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine
    Scientists at the Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine — at work in the woodland setting of Sterling Forest, New York, are seeking to understand how environmental factors can trigger cancer development and how to improve the health of people around the world.
     
  • Thinking Small
    The New Drug Targets Are Molecules
    The molecular biology revolution has transformed the discovery of new drugs designed to treat cancer. Today, drug discovery is far more “target-driven,” as advances in technology provide insights into the most fundamental mechanisms controlling cell growth and development.
     
  • A Doctor in the Making
    Tommy Waters
    Sometime in the next year or so, Tommy Waters will take the Medical College Admission Test. For many test-takers, the exam will be one of the biggest challenges of their lives. But for Tommy, his biggest challenge is already behind him.
     
  • Found in Translation
    The Interdisciplinary Melanoma Cooperative Group (IMCG)
    Melanoma strikes more than 62,000 people and claims more than 8,000 lives annually. To accelerate the search for answers, NYU in 2002 established the Interdisciplinary Melanoma Cooperative Group (IMCG). It has rapidly come to embody the power of the translational model.
     
  • A Partnership of Daring and Hope: The Fight Against Locally Advanced Breast Cancer
    Silvia Formenti, MD
    It is a type of breast tumor measuring five or more centimeters in diameter, in some cases large enough to penetrate the skin. Yet it afflicts a fifth of all women with breast cancer in this country, many of whom are Latina or Eastern European immigrants from medically underserved communities. “People wonder why these women wait so long to seek care—but when you ask them about their greatest challenges, cancer is never number one.”